fall injury attorney

Slip and Falls

If you are at someone’s business, home, or property, you have an expectation that you will remain safe and not be injured. This expectation often includes the belief that the other person’s property is kept in a reasonable state of repair and that if there are any dangers, the other person will warn you of them. When accidents do occur on someone else’s property, the resulting injuries can be severe. Fortunately, in these situations, an experienced attorney can help you hold the responsible party accountable for your losses.

Ohio Laws involving Slip and Fall Accidents

If you are injured on someone else’s property, the property owner is often legally responsible to compensate you for various damages including medical expenses.

“Premise liability” is the type of personal injury law that applies to accidents that occur due to hazards on another person’s property. In most situations, a property owner is liable for injuries that are incurred on his or her property due to defects that the owner knew about but failed to either correct or warn about. Some of the most common defects that lead to slip and fall accidents include broken handrails, broken steps, cracks in the pavement, poor lighting, puddles, and spills.

There are, however, some exceptions to premise liability. These exceptions include the following:

  • Comparative negligence: In the state of Ohio, a person often encounters obstacles in receiving compensation for injuries related to a defect in someone’s property when that person’s own actions contributed to the accident. This is referred to as comparative negligence.
  • Open and obvious dangers: If a hazard that caused an accident was obvious to a person and something that a person should have been capable of avoiding, law in Ohio allows property owners to raise these grounds as a defense.
  • Recreational users: Law in the state of Ohio acknowledges specific exceptions for people who use a property recreationally including for fishing, hiking, or hunting. In these situations, the property’s owner will not be liable if a person becomes injured while using the property.

Ohio’s Statute of Limitations

A statute of limitations refers to the time that a person has to initiate a legal action. Failure to initiate a lawsuit within this period of time most often results in the action being prohibited by the court. Ohio Revised Code section 2305.10 states that an action for bodily injury must be initiated within two years from the date that the accident occurs. This means that a person must initiate a slip and fall action within two years after the date that the fall occurs.

Contact an Experience Ohio Personal Injury Attorney

At Kruger & Hodges, our legal counsel has the experience necessary to help people who have been impacted by slip and fall accidents. Our law firm understands just how devastating these accidents can be and will remain committed to making sure that you obtain the compensation you deserve. Contact us today to schedule an initial free consultation with a premises liability attorney.