Probation Violations

Ohio law offers probation as an alternative to imprisonment to those individuals who qualify. When people fail to meet the terms of probation, prosecutors in Ohio consider these serious violations. Frequently, probation violations result in a person facing additional penalties. If you have violated probation, it is critical to quickly obtain the assistance of a lawyer who will remain committed to making sure that your case resolves in the best possible manner.

What You can Expect as Terms of Your Probation

Probation terms are serious and the state of Ohio expects you to follow them perfectly. Some of the most common terms that you can expect your probation to include are the following:

  • Attend classes or counseling sessions
  • Find an appropriate job
  • Make your home available for observation by an officer
  • Not leaving a specified area
  • Paying any associated fees or restitution
  • Performing community service
  • Submitting to random alcohol or drug testing
  • Supporting anyone who is dependent on you
  • Timely reporting to your parole officer

If you violate any of the terms that comprise your probation order or if your parole or probation officer has reasonable grounds to believe that you have violated any of your probation’s terms, you will be arrested by law enforcement.

Penalties Associated with Probation Violation in Ohio

There are numerous penalties that you can end up facing due to a probation violation in Ohio, but the most common punishments that you can end up facing include:

  • Additional charges and penalties being added to your initial sentence
  • Arrest
  • A guilty conviction for the original offense
  • No right to bond after an arrest
  • Receiving the maximum punishment possible for the original sentence
  • The time on probation you have already served not counting toward your sentence

Probation Hearings for Violations

After an arrest for violating probation, you can expect to attend a hearing in front of a judge. A jury will not be present at this hearing because you have already been convicted of a crime. Instead, a sentencing judge will hear details about your violation and decide if a violation of the established terms and conditions actually occurred. Also, unlike a criminal trial, the judge can require you to testify against yourself. Prosecution during probation hearings is not required to establish that you violated probation beyond a reasonable doubt, but instead by the lower standard of preponderance of the evidence, which involves proving that you more likely than not committed the violation. Given these many complicated details, it is often critical to have an attorney help you navigate this process.

Speak with an Experienced Criminal Defense Attorney

It is critical to immediately retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney if you have violated the terms of your probation. At Kruger & Hodges, we understand the various laws involved with probation violations and we are committed to making sure that you have the strongest defense possible. Contact our law office today to schedule an initial free case evaluation with one of our criminal defense lawyers.